Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease common in middle age, especially in women. The disease affects peripheral joints, including the wrists, feet, ankles, and knees. The cause is unknown and eyes and skin also can be involved. Early aggressive therapy with immunosuppressive drugs and anti-inflammatories appears to delay joint destruction. More recently, biologic agents have been added to regimens that include TNF inhibitors, WBC modulators, and growth factor inhibitors. Research is ongoing to evaluate the effects of stem cells on auto-immune conditions. According to the Journal of Translational Research, “The ability of MSC to inhibit immune response, while offering the possibility of inducing/accelerating healing of tissue that has already been damaged, makes this population attractive for treatment of autoimmune disorders.”

     CELL SURGICAL NETWORK has developed a specific SVF deployment protocol that attempts to utilize the potential immune-modulatory, anti-inflammatory, and regenerative properties of SVF (rich in mesenchymal stem cells and growth factors). SVF is deployed systemically and may require repeat dosing. This is done as an outpatient at the time of SVF harvesting and procurement. The entire cellular surgical procedure takes approximately three hours.

     We care about our Rheumatoid Arthritis patients at Cell Surgical Network and take pride in the time we provide to our patients to deploy the best protocols to help our patients achieve their goals. By filling out Candidate Application, we will answer the questions and concerns you may have about Cell Surgical Network protocols for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

 
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Cell Surgical Network Study for Stromal Vascular Fraction Registered by ClinicalTrials.gov

Rancho Mirage, CA (PRWEB) October 14, 2013

Clinicaltrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health has registered on their public site an IRB approved safety study from the Cell Surgical Network, Inc.. This study is available for patients with various degenerative and inflammatory conditions to undergo Stromal Vascular Fraction deployment for the evaluation and for the advancement of future stem cell therapy procedures. Stromal Vascular Fraction is rich in autologous adipose derived stem cells and growth factors.

Stromal Vascular Fraction (SVF) is obtained by lipo-harvesting, procurement, and lipo-transfer as a same day operative procedure to provide therapy to patients with various degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Patients must be 16 years or older, male or female and have a degenerative disease or inflammatory disease that meets criteria for treatment under the IRB which includes: Arthritis, Auto-immune disease, COPD, Cardiomyopathy, Peyronies Disease, Interstitial Cystitis, Erectile Dysfunction, and Neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson’s, ALS, Neuropathy. Patients must be healthy enough to tolerate a local anesthetic, must not have active cancer or infections.

Dr. Elliot Lander, and Dr. Mark Berman, founders of the Cell Surgical Network Inc. will conduct the study: “Ever since our inception, it’s been our goal to maintain transparency during our investigations. With a closed surgical procedure we can provide effective safety studies and evolve good empirical data that will allow us and others to ultimately refine our protocols,” says Dr. Berman.

The purpose of the safety study is to evaluate for any adverse effects that may be related to the administration and reception of autologous adipose derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF). Secondarily, the study monitors the results of subjective and objective findings as it applies to the non-blinded deployment of autologous SVF for various inflammatory and/or degenerative conditions including select orthopedic, neurologic, urologic and cardio-pulmonary conditions. SVF deployments include intra-venous, intra-articular, and soft tissue injections.

Outcome measures will include the number of participants with adverse events related to either SVF deployment or the lipo-harvesting procedure. Interested patients should contact the treatment center by phone: 800-231-0407 or via email: info(at)cellsurgicalnetwork(dot)com

About Cell Surgical Network:

The affiliates of the Cell Surgical Network (CSN) are devoted to advancing access and quality care in the area of adult stem cell regenerative medicine in order to help people suffering from a variety of inflammatory and degenerative conditions. The Cell Surgical Network was founded nearly two years after the formation of the California Stem Cell Treatment Center (founded in 2010). Affiliate members are generally made up of multi-state and international teams of multidisciplinary physicians in order to best assess and provide care for our patients. The Cell Surgical Network emphasizes quality and is highly committed to clinical research and the advancement of regenerative medicine.

 
Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in articular diseases.

Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2008 Apr;22(2):269-84
Authors: Jorgensen C, Djouad F, Bouffi C, Mrugala D, Noël D

Although cartilage defects are common features of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, current treatments can rarely restore the full function of native cartilage. Recent studies have provided new perspectives for cartilage engineering using multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Moreover, MSC have been used as immunosuppressant agents in autoimmune diseases and have tested successfully in animal models of arthritis. However, the sequential events occurring during chondrogenesis must be fully understood before we can reproduce the complex molecular events that lead to MSC differentiation and long-term maintenance of cartilage characteristics in the context of chronic joint inflammation. This chapter focuses on the potential of MSC to repair cartilage, with an emphasis on the factors that are known to be required in inducing chondrogenesis and on their immunosuppressive potential.

PMID: 18455684 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Autologous stem cell transplantation in autoimmune and rheumatic diseases: from the molecular background to clinical applications.
 

Scand J Rheumatol. 2010;39(1):1-11
Authors: Szodoray P, Varoczy L, Szegedi G, Zeher M

Autoimmune diseases have a multifactorial origin. Because of disturbances of the immune system, autoreactive T and B cells target self-antigens, leading to permanent organ damage. Despite novel therapeutic protocols, the disease course is chronic and in many instances the outcome is lethal. The efficacy of stem cell therapy has been observed in autoimmune animal models and in autoimmune diseases related to haematological abnormalities. Although the therapy is more than 30 years old, its broad spread has been delayed by the serious side-effects due to the conditioning treatments based on oncological protocols. Evaluation of the data of patients who have undergone autologous stem cell therapy reinforced the view that protocols used for conditioning treatments, mostly causing lymphoablation, and procedures carried out in specialist centres significantly reduced mortality, with an almost optimal therapeutical efficacy. New, multicentre investigations have been launched to compare the efficacy of various protocols. In this review, we summarize certain aspects of the molecular background of autologous stem cell transplantation and also depict the response to therapy in various autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
PMID: 20132064 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases: an observational study on 12 years’ experience from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Working Party on Autoimmune Diseases.

Haematologica. 2010 Feb;95(2):284-92
Authors: Farge D, Labopin M, Tyndall A, Fassas A, Mancardi GL, Van Laar J, Ouyang J, Kozak T, Moore J, Kötter I, Chesnel V, Marmont A, Gratwohl A, Saccardi R

BACKGROUND: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used since 1996 for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases refractory to approved therapies. We evaluated the long-term outcomes of these transplants and aimed to identify potential prognostic factors. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this observational study we analyzed all first autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants for autoimmune diseases reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) registry between 1996-2007. The primary end-points for analysis were overall survival, progression-free survival and transplant-related mortality at 100 days. RESULTS: Nine hundred patients with autoimmune diseases (64% female; median age, 35 years) who underwent a first autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant were included. The main diseases were multiple sclerosis (n=345), systemic sclerosis (n=175), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=85), rheumatoid arthritis (n=89), juvenile arthritis (n=65), and hematologic immune cytopenia (n=37). Among all patients, the 5-year survival was 85% and the progression-free survival 43%, although the rates varied widely according to the type of autoimmune disease. By multivariate analysis, the 100-day transplant-related mortality was associated with the transplant centers’ experience (P=0.003) and type of autoimmune disease (P=0.03). No significant influence of transplant technique was identified. Age less than 35 years (P=0.004), transplantation after 2000 (P=0.0015) and diagnosis (P=0.0007) were associated with progression-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: This largest cohort studied worldwide shows that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can induce sustained remissions for more than 5 years in patients with severe autoimmune diseases refractory to conventional therapy. The type of autoimmune disease, rather than transplant technique, was the most relevant determinant of outcome. Results improved with time and were associated with the transplant centers’ experience. These data support ongoing and planned phase III trials to evaluate the place of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment strategy for severe autoimmune diseases.

PMID: 19773265 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Mesenchymal stem cells: innovative therapeutic tools for rheumatic diseases.

Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2009 Jul;5(7):392-9
Authors: Djouad F, Bouffi C, Ghannam S, Noël D, Jorgensen C

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as they are also known, have been identified in bone marrow as well as in other tissues of the joint, including adipose, synovium, periosteum, perichondrium, and cartilage. These cells are characterized by their phenotype and their ability to differentiate into three lineages: chondrocytes, osteoblasts and adipocytes. Importantly, MSCs also potently modulate immune responses, exhibit healing capacities, improve angiogenesis and prevent fibrosis. These properties might be explained at least in part by the trophic effects of MSCs through the secretion of a number of cytokines and growth factors. However, the mechanisms involved in the differentiation potential of MSCs, and their immunomodulatory and paracrine properties, are currently being extensively studied. These unique properties of MSCs confer on them the potential to be used for therapeutic applications in rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, genetic bone and cartilage disorders as well as bone metastasis.

PMID: 19568253 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Mesenchymal stem cells in arthritis.

Z Rheumatol. 2009 May;68(3):228-33
Authors: David JP, Zwerina J, Schett G

While one of the major achievements of the 20th century was prolonging life expectancy in developed countries, the main challenge of the 21st century is to improve the quality of life of the aging population. Aging is associated with a progressive reduction of organ system function. Therefore, regenerative medicine will be one of the major developing fields of medicine. This new medical field does not only apply to aging but also to all degenerative diseases, such as arthritis and degenerative joint disease, which lead to progressive degeneration of mesenchymal tissues such as bone and cartilage. The discovery of pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers a promising alternative to surgery for non-invasive regenerative therapies of mesenchymal tissues. This review focuses on the characterization and potential application of MSCs in the regeneration of damaged joints.

PMID: 19384551 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Regenerative potential of human adult precursor cells: cell therapy–an option for treating cartilage defects?

Z Rheumatol. 2009 May;68(3):234-8
Authors: Dehne T, Tschirschmann M, Lauster R, Sittinger M

Cell-based therapeutical approaches are already in clinical use and are attracting growing interest for the treatment of joint defects. Mesenchymal stem and precursor cells (MSC) cover a wide range of properties that are useful for the regeneration process of bone and cartilage defects. The following article is an overview of the regenerative potential of MSC and discusses how the properties of these cells can be used for the development of new strategies in regenerative medicine.

PMID: 19384550 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
Stem cell transplantation in rheumatoid arthritis.

Autoimmunity. 2008 Dec;41(8):625-31
Authors: Snowden JA, Kapoor S, Wilson AG

The therapeutic potential of high dose cytotoxic therapy and stem cell transplantation (SCT) in severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was originally supported by animal studies and serendipitous clinical cases where allogeneic and autologous procedures were shown to ameliorate and potentially cure the disease. Phase I and Phase II clinical studies established the feasibility, safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell mobilisation and transplantation. Although it was clear that the effects of high dose chemotherapy and autologous SCT could safely achieve profound responses, sustained control of disease usually required the reintroduction of disease modifying agents. Responses were improved with dose escalation of the conditioning regimen, and also with post-SCT therapy, such as rituximab, but were not observed with graft manipulation. Phase III studies were attempted, but recruitment was compromised by the increasingly widespread use of biological anti-rheumatic agents. Autologous SCT is now only reasonably considered in relatively rare patients whose disease has resisted conventional and biological treatments, and small numbers of cases continue to be registered with the EBMT. Occasional patients treated with allogeneic and syngeneic SCT continue to stimulate academic interest, particularly as some appear to be cured, but significant logistical and toxicity issues mean that routine and widespread application is unrealistic. In summary, SCT continues to have a limited therapeutic potential in rare patients with RA refractory to modern therapy and sufficient fitness for the procedure. From a scientific perspective, ablation of the dysfunctional rheumatoid immune system and its reconstruction with SCT has provided useful insights into the pathophysiology of RA.

PMID: 18958746 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Mesenchymal stem cells and immunomodulation: toward new immunosuppressive strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases?

Rev Med Interne. 2009 Mar;30(3):287-99
Authors: Larghero J, Vija L, Lecourt S, Michel L, Verrecchia F, Farge D

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent a population of the bone marrow microenvironment, which participates in the regulation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. MSC are multipotent non-haematopoietic progenitors, which have been explored as a promising treatment in tissue regeneration. Both in vitro and in vivo, the MSC inhibit the T, B, NK and dendritic cell functions. Although MSC immunomodulating properties are not yet completely understood, their low immunogenic potential can be used as a therapeutic tool not only for regenerative medicine, but also for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation as well as for specific cases of severe refractory autoimmune diseases. Experimental and clinical data gave encouraging results, showing that MSC injection allowed controlling refractory GVHD, restoring bone development in children with osteogenesis imperfecta or improving heart function after myocardial infarction. Phase I-II studies are in progress in various countries to investigate the potential benefit from MSC due to their immunosuppressive properties, as an adjunctive therapy for severe refractory autoimmune disease.

PMID: 18930338 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 

Mesenchymal stem cells and immunomodulation: toward new immunosuppressive strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases?

Rev Med Interne. 2009 Mar;30(3):287-99
Authors: Larghero J, Vija L, Lecourt S, Michel L, Verrecchia F, Farge D

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent a population of the bone marrow microenvironment, which participates in the regulation of haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. MSC are multipotent non-haematopoietic progenitors, which have been explored as a promising treatment in tissue regeneration. Both in vitro and in vivo, the MSC inhibit the T, B, NK and dendritic cell functions. Although MSC immunomodulating properties are not yet completely understood, their low immunogenic potential can be used as a therapeutic tool not only for regenerative medicine, but also for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation as well as for specific cases of severe refractory autoimmune diseases. Experimental and clinical data gave encouraging results, showing that MSC injection allowed controlling refractory GVHD, restoring bone development in children with osteogenesis imperfecta or improving heart function after myocardial infarction. Phase I-II studies are in progress in various countries to investigate the potential benefit from MSC due to their immunosuppressive properties, as an adjunctive therapy for severe refractory autoimmune disease.

PMID: 18930338 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

 
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