Stroke
 

     Stroke, also known as cerebro-vascular accident, is caused by a disturbance in blood supply to the brain. Stroke affects millions of Americans every year. The result is ischemic brain injury which means that part of the brain has suffered from lack of oxygen and this has resulted in vital tissue destruction. Symptoms vary depending on the anatomic location of the event and extent and duration of the tissue loss. After acute management, long term healing must occur which requires management of swelling and neovascularization of damaged tissue. Researchers particularly in Europe have been actively studying the use of mesenchymal stem cells to help promote healing after ischemic brain injury.

     Cell Surgical Network has developed a specific SVF deployment protocol that attempts to utilize the anti-inflammatory and potential regenerative properties of SVF (rich in mesenchymal stem cells and growth factors). SVF is systemically deployed and is expected to focus on damaged areas of the central nervous system. Special measures are taken to optimize transport of the SVF across the blood-brain barrier to improve central nervous system uptake. This is all done as an outpatient at the time of SVF harvesting and procurement. The entire cellular surgical procedure takes approximately three hours.
 

     We care about our Stroke Recovery patients at the Cell Surgical Network and take pride in the time we provide to our patients to deploy the best protocols to help our patients achieve their goals. By filling out Confidential Candidate Application, we will answer the questions and concerns you may have about and Cell Surgical Network protocols for Stroke Recovery.

 
CANDIDATE APPLICATION


Stem Cell Therapy for Abrogating Stroke-Induced Neuroinflammation and Relevant Secondary Cell Death Mechanisms.
 
Prog Neurobiol. 2017 Jul 22. pii: S0301-0082(17)30082-5. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2017.07.004. Authors: Stonesifer C, Corey S, Ghanekar S, Diamandis Z, Acosta SA, Borlongan CV.

Abstract

Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. A key secondary cell death mechanism mediating neurological damage following the initial episode of ischemic stroke is the upregulation of endogenous neuroinflammatory processes to levels that destroy hypoxic tissue local to the area of insult, induce apoptosis, and initiate a feedback loop of inflammatory cascades that can expand the region of damage. Stem cell therapy has emerged as an experimental treatment for stroke, and accumulating evidence supports the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells to abrogate stroke-induced inflammation. In this review, we investigate clinically relevant stem cell types, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), neural stem cells (NSCs), extraembryonic stem cells, adipose tissue-derived stem cells, breast milk-derived stem cells, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, dental tissue-derived stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), teratocarcinoma-derived Ntera2/D1 neuron-like cells (NT2N), c-mycER(TAM) modified NSCs (CTX0E03), and notch-transfected mesenchymal stromal cells (SB623), comparing their potential efficacy to sequester stroke-induced neuroinflammation and their feasibility as translational clinical cell sources. To this end, we highlight that MSCs, with a proven track record of safety and efficacy as a transplantable cell for hematologic diseases, stand as an attractive cell type that confers superior anti-inflammatory effects in stroke both in vitro and in vivo. That stem cells can mount a robust anti-inflammatory action against stroke complements the regenerative processes of cell replacement and neurotrophic factor secretion conventionally ascribed to cell-based therapy in neurological disorders.

 
[bot_catcher]